Maternity Experience

Informed Choice

Why the wonderful #matexp has given me hope

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Imagine, a consultant, a midwife, a doula, a support worker, a commissioner, a campaigner and a mother all coming together to help support and improve maternity services for all women and their families.

Wonderful you may say, but will this really ever happen you may wonder? The answer is yes!

#MatExp is a wonderful grassroots campaign using the Whose Shoes?® approach to help identify and help improve our national maternity services. By means of workshops in local hospitals users of maternity services are brought together with others to join conversations about their experiences of maternity care and share what really made a difference to them personally and their experience and talk about ways that care can be improved. These workshops enable health care professionals (in and beyond the NHS) and local communities to listen and work in partnership with women and their families to find ways to improve local and national maternity services. Anyone can take part whether your a maternity service user, partner, community group or NHS staff, from chief executive to volunteer all are welcome to attend and share. Also on twitter using the hashtag #Matexp there are many amazing people sharing personal stories, experiences, achievements and ways they are actively trying to improve care both in there local hospitals but nationally too.

I personally have been involved in a #Matexp campaign for NHS change day. It was action 5 – ‘life with a new baby’ as breastfeeding champion along with the lovely Helen Calvert. Personally for me #Matexp has been really wonderful and something im proud to be part of. After suffering poor care with my first birth and subsequent birth trauma and PTSD, #Matexp has given me hope.

Hope that things can change.

Hope that women will be the centre of maternity care.

Hope that the culture of birth and our maternity services will improve.

Hope that the voices of women will finally be heard.

As part of #Matexp I have made contact with some amazing people such a Flo, Gill, Rachel and Helen as well as fantastic midwives such as Jenny and mothers such as Leigh. All are doing amazing things to improve services for women often after personal experiences. Knowing that there are so many people who genuinely want to work to improve services and make care better and who truly value women has helped me heal and also restored my belief in maternity care. It has given me the opportunity to to tell my story and then feel part of improving things to make care given better for others something I am so passionate about. It has also given me confidence to be bold and change things in my own job and NHS trust as I feel supported by some amazing people. Seeing their successes has spurred me on and helped me believe that we can all make a difference.

More importantly #Matexp has given me hope. Hope that one day we will provide a maternity experience that is individualised, respectful, gives dignity and allows for informed choice. That puts a woman, her baby, her family and their needs first. It will mean birth experiences that do not result in trauma but that even under difficult circumstances will make a woman feel loved, protected and supported. Yes I have hope, because finally not only has my voice been heard but the voices of women everywhere will be heard, no matter who they are, what they do, or what choices they made. Why is this so important, because your birth experience stays with with you the good and the bad, it can have a profound effect on you as a family as you start on your journey as parents. All women, babies and families are special and deserving of the best maternity care possible. So join in, get involved and share your stories and your ideas. There’s exciting times a head in #Matexp and together we can make a difference.
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Emma Jane Sasaru

@ESasaruNHS

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#MatExp and NHS change day – a call to action to support Breastfeeding

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Helen Calvert and I are the breastfeeding champions for the NHS Change Day #MatExp campaign. What on earth does that mean I hear you ask? It means that we have the privilege of being part of a powerful grassroots campaign using the Whose Shoes?® approach to identify and share best practice across the nation’s maternity services and look at ways we can improve these services for women and their families. The campaign has already been triggering discussions about what needs to improve to make sure women and their families have the care that is right for them. You can read all about it here: http://changeday.nhs.uk/campaigns/matexp/

There are 8 existing #MatExp Change Day actions, and we are focusing on #MatExp5 – Life With A New Baby, and in particular breastfeeding: http://changeday.nhs.uk/campaigns/matexp/matexp-improving-maternity-experience-just/

Anyone familiar with this blog will know that I suffered birth trauma with my first daughter and I am very passionate about improving maternity and perinatal care for women and their families that is patient centred and supportive of their choices. I work as a breastfeeding peer support worker for the NHS helping families in Neonatal, hospital and community. I also volunteer for the BfN and am a trained Doula. I write my blog to raise awareness of birth trauma and Perinatal mental health, reduce stigma and help others. I am passionate about supporting women in their breastfeeding journey especially those that have had pre-term babies. You can read about my story here http://changeday.nhs.uk/story35/

Helen started the #hospitalbreastfeeding campaign on Twitter following her experiences of breastfeeding her younger son, David, who has a congenital heart defect. This campaign led to the launch of Helen’s website, http://www.heartmummy.co.uk, which has key messages to help medical professionals to understand what’s in it for them when it comes to supporting breastfeeding in wards and departments. It provides much needed information to help healthcare professionals provide support to breastfeeding mom’s especially with sick vulnerable babies. Helen tirelessly campaigns to raise awareness for families with children who have a heart defect and also to support moms in their breastfeeding journey.

So what is it that we would like you to do?

Well, firstly, why not log an action on the NHS Change Day website, where “we give ourselves permission to make the changes we can make, share them, and inspire others”? What’s lovely is this is for anyone. Most of us come into contact with women and babies, so simple things like a simple smile to a new mother or a kind word or deed can make a difference.

If you are working in maternity services or are passionate about supporting women and their families and are going to log an action, do so under the #Matexp campaign. There are a few actions to choose from, why not go for something that will make a change to the breastfeeding experience of UK families? Actions can be as simple as you like, what matters is they are personal to you.

Here are our suggestions, and how to log your action. Your action could be to:

  1. Look outside of the NHS for breastfeeding information to use to support families.[Best beginnings, BfN, UNICEF, ABM, La Leche League, kellymom, Dr Jack Newman etc.]
  2. Always remember that breastfeeding is more likely to be possible than impossible. Just keep this in mind every day and see how it changes your approach to families who want to breastfeed.
  3. Follow the RCN’s guidelines for supporting breastfeeding on paediatric wards: http://www.rcn.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/270161/003544.pdf
  4. Download and share the posters from heartmummy.co.uk – simple messages and guidance explaining how breastfeeding can be a key part of a child’s medical care.
  5. Support all families to make an informed choice by giving accurate evidence based information regarding breastfeeding.
  6. Encourage each other to support a mom whatever her feeding choice.
  7. Help the wards/places we work in to reach out/work towards Unicef baby friendly accreditation. Use the resources they provide and makes sure the culture reflects those standards.
  8. Not to use the term Breast is Best, but seek to normalise breastfeeding as the biological norm.
  9. Always introduce yourself #hellomynameis and explain who you are and your role. Be friendly, give of your time, listen and remember that each is an individual trying hard to do the best for their babies. Smile!
  10. Think about language, what we say matters. Make sure we are not undermining breastfeeding, causing a woman to doubt her ability to care for her baby.

To log your action go to : http://changeday.nhs.uk/campaigns/matexp/ scroll down and click on the light bulb that says action. Then follow the instructions. Put #MatExp5 in the title of your action to link it to our area of the campaign if you would like to, and don’t forget to tweet and share your action once you’ve written it!

Also you can join or set up one of the maternity workshops that are going to be running around the country. These workshops give the opportunity for all, whether staff or service users, to engage, share ideas, and look at ways to improve our maternity services.

What are we hoping to achieve?

When we spoke to women a few core things became clear, they wanted clear consistent advice on breastfeeding, good support in hospital and lots of encouragement and support. They spoke about respect for their choices and not having things forced on them by healthcare professionals and how sometimes all the wanted was for someone to say “well done’.

The standard of care we see in our maternity units needs to improve. To do this we must all work together, staff and service users, men and women. We all want women and families to be supported in their choices and have the best possible care. The maternity experience a woman has can stay with her all her life, as can the support she receives to feed her baby. We owe it to women and their families to make a change. What matters is real people, real families and real lives. Women should be equal partners in their maternity care their voices need to be heard so that the maternity experience meets individual needs. Dignity and respect must govern all we do. Maybe we can only make small changes or pledge small actions, but when they all join up together that means big changes for women, for families, for us all.

Thank you Emma and Helen

Emma’s change day action: http://changeday.nhs.uk/user_action/ive-got-involved-in-the-matexp-actions/

Helens change day action: http://changeday.nhs.uk/user_action/matexp5-encouraging-support-for-breastfeeding-on-childrens-wards/

 

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#MatExp – A Midwife’s View

As promised in my first MatExp feedback post, I have more stories to share with you.  Today I have pleasure in sharing the maternity experience of a mum with a different perspective on the care she received, as she has worked as a midwife.  In her own words:

Wythenshawe Hospital MLU
Wythenshawe Hospital MLU

“There was nothing truly awful to say about my care, I was just a bit disappointed. I couldn’t take my old consultant hat off so kept thinking about the improvements that were needed and where would I start?! I’ll try and outline the issues as I saw them as briefly as my general verbosity will allow!

Good points first! All 5 midwives I met antenatally and the 2 postnatally were very nice and cheery. The appointments ran pretty much on time and the postnatal visits happened when they said. The antenatal classes were really good. Pitched at just the right level and even my husband enjoyed them. Although there wasn’t much time for socialising, the midwife orchestrated a no pressure way for us to swap contact details and as a result I have made a really good friend. They told me about the Cherubs group, which was good. The handover to the health visitors seemed pretty smooth. Oh yes – this is the best one! My experience of giving birth at the Wythenshawe midwife led unit was fantastic. Every aspect was exactly what we needed and we felt cared for and very special, which is difficult to achieve in a busy unit like that.

Ok, now the not so good! At my booking it was presumed I was ‘low-risk’ (which I am, but the midwife would not have known that). All of the information about care etc was given prior to finding out if that care was going to be appropriate for me or not. I was only asked about ‘me’ at the end and this was a very tick-box exercise. Don’t get me wrong, I know from experience how tough it is to do a booking visit in an hour (or even an hour and a half), but it is possible to individualise the discussion and make the woman feel that this is about the service fitting around her needs rather than her just fitting into the service. Despite the presumption about my low risk status I was not told about my birth place options. The midwife said ‘so you’ll be coming to Macclesfield, right?’ And ticked the place of birth discussion box! Home birth was barely mentioned and the option of using the local midwife led unit was not mentioned at all at any of my appointments, including my longer birth planning appointment. I found out (through Google) about the Wythenshawe MLU at 39 weeks (as I was new to the area I didn’t know where hospitals were and what provision they had).

Thankfully Wythenshawe were excellent – booked me in the next day, gave me a tour of the unit and I had an excellent experience of intrapartum care there.

In general, the information provision was poor. Despite quite long ‘chats’ about topics like the weather, the midwife’s daughter’s pram choices, new granddaughter, for example, little time was spent on birth planning info, breastfeeding info etc. so I don’t think this was a ‘time’ issue. There were no discussions, I was just told how things would be. For example, “we won’t let you go past 41+5 weeks”, “we will induce you”, etc. It made me very worried for women who are not aware of the concept of informed choice, or who are aware but are too polite / nervous / grateful to ask what their options are. I am aware that some of this could have been down to the fact I was a midwife. But actually I don’t think the 2 midwives I told remembered this (I could tell from the way one of them briefly explained Vitamin K to me), so I’m fairly sure I saw an accurate picture of the care most women get.

Probably the most notable thing was an issue with growth measurements. I was measuring slightly under (2cms below my gestation) for 2 consecutive appointments. I hadn’t been that worried until over the next 2 weeks between appointments I felt like I hadn’t grown at all. I said this to the midwife at my 36 week appointment who measured me and said that I measured 36cms so no need to worry. However, she had not actually found my fundus (top of the uterus) and just put her tape measure to my sternum, where my fundus should have been at that gestation. Only, the whole point was that it was not there! It was much lower – 4cms lower, and I had not grown at all in the past 2 weeks, as I suspected. The midwife was a little embarrassed (understandably) when I pointed this out. She flippantly remarked that she could make those measurements anything she wanted to, so they were pointless. After some discussion she referred me to a consultant, who referred me for a scan as she was concerned about the growth. In the end it was all fine, baby was bang on average weight. But that wasn’t the point, a truly compromised baby could have been missed.

I also had a problem with the way they gathered feedback. They were doing the Government’s ‘friends and family test’ and gave out cards for feedback. No problem there. However the midwife handed it to me in an appointment and insisted on me doing it there and then in front of her. So no anonymity and no chance of honest, useful feedback. I refused to do this, but I was accosted by the receptionist at my next appointment and was jokingly told that I was not allowed to leave until I filled it in. This time it was the receptionist watching (not so bad), but it had my initials pre-written on the top of my card. I was honest in my brief feedback, but felt very uncomfortable about it, which I’m sure most women would.

My postnatal care was pretty lacking. On the day after I came home I received a phone call to see how I was and to arrange an appointment on day 3 (actually day 4). This is pretty standard practice now and is a change from all women getting a home visit the day after they get home. I don’t have a problem with this as services need to be individualised and not all women want or need a visit, a phone call will do. But the call was not used to find out if I felt I needed a visit, it was to tell me that there would be no visit until day 4. Then a few clinical questions were fired at me! Again, I was fine, but what if I hadn’t have been? The day 4 visit was a whirlwind. I was still in bed, so my dad let the midwife in and showed her upstairs. By the time I met her in the nursery she had said 3 times that she was “only here to weigh the baby”. She set her stall out early that she would not be staying long! Baby had put on weight, so she said well done and left after quickly asking about my blood loss, whether I’d pooed and giving me the contact phone number. I could tell she was busy (it was a Saturday, skeleton staff and she had visits all over Cheshire), so I didn’t dare ask anything!

So, that’s it! I’m afraid to say that I think this might be pretty typical. It probably says more about the model of care, the resources in the team and the workload than the individual midwives. It’s not easy, but individualised, supportive, positive, evidence-based care can be given in a busy NHS maternity service.

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