Maternity Experience

Postnatal Care

Health Visiting & Midwifery – A Partnership

I have great pleasure in sharing with you a guest blog from Health Visiting Lecturer Charlotte Smith and Midwifery Lecturer Neesha Ridley – a great team from UCLan.

Following our wonderfully informative Twitter chat last week, we were asked to contribute to the MatExp blog – what an honour, thank you!

We are writing as a partnership, because this is what we believe health visiting and midwifery should be. To explain, “We” are Neesha and Charlotte, a midwife and health visitor (in that order!) who recently found ourselves united in a number of ways.

First, we are new to our roles as lecturers at the University of Central Lancashire. We enrolled on our teaching course together, thus embarking on our new career journey together – joint working together is enjoyable, time saving, cost effective and efficient, and our shared “newbie” status allows us to express our vulnerabilities and successes openly with each other. (Also, we discover we have a similar sense of humour which is always a bonus!)

Second, our passion for joint working was discovered when Neesha asked Charlotte to come and speak to midwifery students about the role of the health visitor. Neesha had been aware of the importance of MDT working in the childbearing continuum and had organised a succession of guest speakers, designed to give Midwifery students the knowledge and experience of the services they will work alongside in the “real world”. Charlotte leaped at the chance, and went along to the session prepared to outline the role of the health visitor.

What neither of us had been prepared for was the response. Armed with insightful questions and an obvious desire to learn more about their health visiting colleagues, the midwifery students described the need for closer relationships between the two disciplines, and the lack of opportunity in practice to facilitate this.

On feeding this back to the health visiting students, Charlotte had exactly the same response. Why aren’t we being taught with midwives? Why do we not have relationships with our colleagues if we are to work in partnership with them? Why is it that the first time we “properly” meet a midwife is when our training is over? How are we supposed to understand each other’s roles if we learn completely separately?

Our engagement in the Twitter chat around this issue last week confirmed that parents themselves value consistent, seamless support from services in the perinatal period. It also confirmed that at best this experience was inconsistent across the UK.

Just as it is a privilege to be involved in the journey of new parents and the arrival of their baby in the world, so it is equally a privilege to be part of the journey of a new midwife and health visitor into qualification. As we reflected on and evaluated these sessions together, it occurred to us that there were synergies between the two experiences – and it made sense to us that like in every issue in the 1001 critical days, the answer lies in early intervention.

As lecturers, that means introducing the two disciplines in a more facilitative, educational experience during education. In practice, this could be mirrored by a home or clinic joint contact between health visitor, midwife and the family during the antenatal period.

It is well documented that antenatal contacts are significant in improving the health outcomes of women, children and families – we are currently collating the evidence in a paper on exactly this subject. We are very aware that there are organisational and strategic challenges to this proposal, having worked at the coal face for some time and recently, and from listening to our students, and to the views of parents and commissioners. However our third area of unity is this – we have a duty to our professions and to our students, and above all to the children and families who experience our services. We have the privilege of being on a journey with inspirational, committed and dedicated students and we owe it to them to provide the experiences that they identify as facilitating best practice. As a result we are working together not only to influence the curriculum to include structured facilitative relationship building and education between our two professions, but to encourage students to take responsibility for ensuring they maintain this out in the real world.

Not every family would appreciate a joint visit from services – nor might it be economically or organisationally feasible in some cases. But if we educate and practice ourselves as separate, uncommunicative services, families will continue to see us as such. With more conjoined education and more solid relationships from the outset, at least families will have the choice.

Charlotte Smith, RN, HV

Neesha Ridley, RM

TeamWork

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#OxyOct BOOM! What have we all made happen?

Leigh Kendall opened this month for #MatExp with a call to action for Oxytocin October. The campaign is always action focused and we are keen to hear from anyone who is doing something to improve maternity experience in the UK, be it something big or something small. Yet we had already put together a number of blog posts with calls to action, back in #FlamingJune. So I decided that my action for this month would be to revisit those blog posts and find out what progress has been made.

Flo Collage

The original blog posts were on these subjects (each subject links to the relevant post):

Having re-shared the posts on Facebook and Twitter I was delighted to see the responses coming in detailing what has changed, what has been started and what is continuing to be done. Take a look!

Perinatal Anxiety

Sarah McMullen of the NCT explained that she invited Emily Slater (MMHA Campaigns Manager) to speak and run a workshop at the NCT national conference – to raise awareness and inspire action. Sarah says that Emily’s plenary talk to 600+ staff, practitioners & volunteers “was incredibly powerful, and we’re meeting to discuss next steps for NCT”. Sarah added “We’ve also submitted two funding applications relating to mental health awareness (thanks to Rosey Wren for support), and have match-funded a PhD studentship with the wonderful Susan Ayres on Birth Trauma, and are supporting another PhD research project on group identity and PTSD”

Midwives on Twitter commented:

Anxiety capture Deirdre

Anxiety capture Jeannine

To read Jeannine and John’s blog post please click here.  “You matter. I care.”

Emotional Wellbeing

Birth Trauma Chat

#MatExp team member Emma Jane Sasaru has been incredibly active over the last few months.  She has launched Unfold Your Wings a place of information and support aiming to raise awareness of Perinatal PTSD, birth trauma, reduce stigma and give sufferers hope.  She has also launched a CoCreation Network community around perinatal mental health.  Emma has then collaborated with #MatExp team member Susanne Remic to bring about a weekly #BirthTraumaChat on Twitter run jointly from Unfold Your Wings and Maternity Matters.

Sue Henry

Also launched this month by West London Mental Health NHS Trust was this fantastic short film about perinatal mental health: https://vimeo.com/143359951 This film has already sparked many useful conversations.

PMH

Continuity of Care

I was speaking to a commissioner from Cheshire this month about the decision to commission OnetoOne Midwives. The company has this month posted an overview of their caseloading model: http://www.onetoonemidwives.org/_news/caseloading-midwifery-an-ever-evolving-model-of-care

In her talk at a recent National Maternity Review event, Baroness Julie Cumberlege made it very clear that the call for continuity of care is being heard by the review team up and down the country. Neighbourhood Midwives led a discussion at the review’s Birth Tank 2 event, and there were a couple of other discussions where options for continuity were also explored.

Support for Midwives

Poem from banksy midwife @JennytheM:

Midwives JennytheM

Midwife Deirdre Munro celebrated the launch of the new Global Village Midwives website this week. The movement is over a year old and Deirdre explains:

GVM capture

global village midwives

Infant Feeding

Lots of news about infant feeding from passionate individuals and voluntary organisations.  On our #MatExp Facebook group Zoe Woodman explained: “In May we got approval from NCT to run a branch funded feeding support group. Started in June with an NCT bfc attending who is also an IBCLC. We are on 3 boundaries in terms of commissioning services so no local peer to peer style support groups were running within 8miles. The only service is an HV clinic once a week and it’s one on one so you have to wait outside the room to be seen. It’s been on our branch aims at our AMM since I’ve been chair (4yrs!) so finally chuffed to see it in action and I will get to use it myself in January for no3! It’s running twice a month currently but hope we can get funding in the future to run weekly. It’s slowly building in terms of attendance. Feedback so far is great!”

Dorking NCT

Claire Czjakowska’s Breastfeeding Advert is coming together and is looking very exciting – watch this space!  Breastfeeding in Trafford launched its Twitter account this month so please follow for local breastfeeding news.  BfN Portsmouth tweeted:

Bf capture

Midwifery students at the University of Worcester have launched a petition around the questionable practices of infant formula companies – follow the hashtag #WeakenTheFormula for more information.

As if this wasn’t enough, this month has seen the launch of the World Breastfeeding Trend Initiative for the UK.  A committed group of individuals from the major breastfeeding voluntary organisations have come together to measure the country’s performance against the WHO Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding.  Please visit the website for more information on how this project is structured and the indicators against which the UK will be measured.  The project needs lots of input from families and professionals so please follow @wbtiuk on Twitter and find out how you can help.

WBTI capture

Tongue Tie

Doula Zoe Walsh updated us: “We held a North West tongue-tie workshop in Blackpool. It’s now going on the MSLC agenda for Blackpool so that we can discuss local provision and see if it’s meeting the needs of local families.”  

Breastfeeding and Medications

Friend of DIBM helpline

From a personal point of view, I finally got around to becoming a friend of the Drugs in Breastmilk Helpline this summer.  The helpline is absolutely vital for ensuring that women get the correct information about what medications they can use when breastfeeding.  The service is funded by the Breastfeeding Network and the charity once again asked supporters to do a #TeaBreakChallenge this month to help raise donations.

Teabreak challenge

A wonderful #MatExp collaboration has sprung up this month between Angelique Fox, Sarah Baker and Wendy Jones.  These two #MatExp mums who have never met in person have both volunteered to help Wendy to collect data and raise awareness with regards to drugs in breastmilk, particularly where dentists and podiatrists are concerned.  It was discussed on the #MatExp Facebook group that these two healthcare professions are often cited as not having up to date information about breastfeeding and medications so this collaborative project is aiming to tackle that.

Luisa Lyons, the Infant Feeding Coordinator who wrote our original post on this subject, gave us this fantastic update: “Been a busy couple of months. Infant feeding e-learning training for doctors up and running at my unit and both paeds and obstetricians encouraged to complete it. Great support from our obstetric consultant clinics director too. General paed nurses now doing mandatory infant feeding training every year. Been invited to teach general paed doctors face to face. Three GP’s have done the UNICEF 2 days bf management course with us and now writing bf training for GPs in Norfolk. Included info on bf and medications with scenarios to both student nurses and our midwives at keyworker training now, and incorporating into Mt for all maternity staff. Also off topic slightly am putting in a WHO code game to all the above which has generated lots of awareness with student midwives and maternity staff. Need to join DIBM as a friend which I had forgotten to do, so thanks for the heads up.”

Dads & Partners

Mark Williams, co-founder of Dads Matter UK, wrote this blog post for us for #OxyOct, detailing his work and campaigning: http://matexp.org.uk/matexp-and-me/dads-matter/

Men Love and Birth

Midwife Mark Harris launched his book this month, Men, Love and Birth, “the book about being present at birth that your lover wants you to read”.

A Manchester midwife reported positive outcomes around new rules enabling dads & partners to stay over on her unit:

Dads & Partners Mags

When asked how we can best support Dads & Partners, newly elected NCT president Seana Talbot tweeted:

Dads & Partners Seana

Community Outreach Midwife Wendy Warrington tweeted:

Dads & Partners Wendy

I asked Wendy about the work she does with regards to Dads & Partners and she explained “I talk about attachment and being with their baby, skin-to-skin touch. Antenatal and postnatal depression, and fathers’ role in supporting their partner in pregnancy, birth and beyond and how they can do this. I talk about baby cues and the impact of father’s involvement on child’s future emotional and cognitive development.  I have had excellent feedback from parents and when I see them after the birth they say they felt well prepared for feeling and emotions experienced post birth. They love the fact that I talked about it”

Collaboration between Midwives and Health Visitors

Health visitors on the #MatExp Facebook group told us:

My CPT & I have established 6 weekly meetings with the community midwife and the GP (whose special interest is pregnancy/neonates) to discuss cases”

“We already have that in my team we meet at least once a month with the midwife – it was weekly but we are very busy at the moment (both us and the midwife). She will just knock on our door though and share things – she really came on board with antenatal contacts telling parents to be and signposting those with small children with any worries to us.”

With excellent timing Sharon White, OBE, Professional Officer of the School & Public Health Nurses Association, then tweeted the updated pathway for health visiting and midwifery partnership.

partnership

And as a result of discussing all of this on Twitter, Sheena Byrom has invited me to lead a tweet chat with @WeMidwives and @WeHealthVisitor in November on the subject of midwife and health visitor collaboration.  Watch this space!

Birth Tank

And so much more has been happening in #OxyOct as well! #MatExp was well represented at the NHS Maternity Review’s Birth Tank 2 event in Birmingham – click here for Emma’s round up. I spoke at the launch of the Improving ME maternity review for Wirral, Merseyside, Warrington and West Lancashire – click here for my round up of the morning. Leigh Kendall and Florence Wilcock spread the word at the RCOG Conference on October 16th, and Leigh spoke at the Royal Society of Medicine event on October 20th.

RCOG

Leigh capture

Baby Loss Awareness Week took place this month and many important discussions were had around the subject of grief and loss, something which affects a number of #MatExp campaign members.  Leigh wrote movingly about Standing on the Periphery for #HugosLegacy.

BabyLoss

The RCM has this month launched its State of Maternity Services Report. Emma Jane Sasaru has written a series of three blogs about What Matters in Birth.  Susanne Remic has been raising awareness of IUGR. Michelle Quashie created fantastic word clouds for display in her local maternity unit.  We now have #MatExpHour every Friday created and launched by Louise Parry – click here for her round up of Week 2.  So much going on!

IUGR

I have no doubt there is much much more that I have missed from this round up. There is so much energy and passion in maternity services, and so much desire for change. Whatever it is you are trying to achieve, please join up with #MatExp via Twitter, Facebook or the website and get encouragement and input from like-minded people. Together we are stronger! Feel the Oxytocin flow!

 

Helen Calvert, 2015

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Dads Matter

As part of Oxytocin October (#OxyOct) I have been revisiting the first set of blog posts we put up calling for people to ACT in certain areas of maternity care. One of these was Time to Act for Dads & Partners, which included a mention of Mark Williams‘ work in this area.

Mark Williams is the founder of a new organisation called Dads Matter UK (Perinatal Mental Health for Fathers). He also founded Fathers Reaching Out, Youngness and Independent Mental Health Campaigners.

Father’s Reaching Out was set up in 2011 to raise awareness surrounding the detrimental impact that postnatal depression (PND) has on both fathers and equally families as a whole. Dads Matters UK aims to raise awareness of perinatal mental health, and educate every dad before the birth about birth trauma and PTSD for men.

We are delighted that Mark has written this blog post for #MatExp as part of #OxyOct.

______________________________________________

Mark Williams 4

Depression can hit up to around one in five fathers by the time the child reaches adolescence. In a published report in 2015, it states that at least 10% of fathers will suffer with postnatal depression, which can include the birth itself and up to a year after. Fathers can develop lots of complications in this period, and this can influence their daily lives as well as affect their role within their family unit. It can impact heavily on their relationships, financial stability alongside lifestyle and emotional states. Emotional problems and psychological health needs are crucial elements to postnatal depression in fathers and need to be addressed. Fathers tend to get forgotten at this important and life changing event of having a baby, with mother and child being the centre of care delivery and rightly so, but we must remember there is a father there too. Fathers often get pushed aside which can result in feelings of isolation, anxiety and confusion at a time when they to need help.

Dads Matter

Dads Matter UK is suggesting that the health service needs to develop a process for the screening and detecting of postnatal depression in fathers. As many fathers, the figures suggest, suffer with anxiety post birth of the child. The birth of a new baby can cause problems such as poor sleep, anxiety and stress. This can lead to problems within the relationship and fundamental communication processes within that relationship. After speaking to hundreds of fathers we are primarily concerned with the health of the father and their families. We feel that postnatal depression in fathers is equally significant and requires important consideration when implementing strategies and screening tools for postnatal depression. Fathers suffering with depression can feel increasingly pushed out and unsure of their role within the family thus affecting the bonding and attachment process between father and child.

Screening is important for men, as they are less likely to seek help and support. Particularly, in relation to their health problems. Due to the associated stigma towards mental health and its associated issues, young fathers are even more likely to be at risk and not seek the help they need. Men are often reluctant to admit that they may have an emotional problem or are unlikely to admit to feeling out of control. If this area of health is not addressed adequately this could lead to further breakdowns in the family structure and have long lasting devastating outcomes for our children.

Mark Williams 3

We must remember that fathers can also suffer from PTSD at the birth. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder can occur following a life-threatening event like military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or violent personal assaults like rape. Most survivors of trauma return to normal given a little time. However, some people have stress reactions that don’t go away on their own, or may even get worse over time. These individuals may develop PTSD.

People who suffer from PTSD often suffer from nightmares, flashbacks, difficulty sleeping, and feeling emotionally numb. These symptoms can significantly impair a person’s daily life. As we know many suffer in silence and let post traumatic stress disorder effect all parts of their daily living. My own nightmares were what if my son had died and the thought of my wife being pregnant in the past did give me so much anxiety that at the time I didn’t know why.

PTSD is marked by clear physical and psychological symptoms. It often has symptoms like depression, substance abuse, problems of memory and cognition, and other physical and mental health problems. The disorder is also associated with difficulties in social or family life, including occupational instability, marital problems, family discord, and difficulties in parenting.

The “invisible wounds” of birth trauma-related PTSD affect not only the father or the family member, but also those around him or her. We must remember it effects everyone and education is needed to prepare the family for what may happen during and after the labour.

We run the risk of letting our fathers down at a time when we need to build strong families and communities for our future generations. Identifying the right support and providing improved health care in relation to Perinatal Mental Health is a top priority, so let’s ensure our health services have the right tools and services available to help and support fathers in relation to their partners’ postnatal depression. When screening fathers we must be mindful to remember that individuals are unique and have developed different styles of coping. It is important to respect the individual, involve them in their care and offer support to them as a person rather than just treat the illness.

Mark Williams, 2015.

What will

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Time to Act for Continuity of Care

There have been some fantastic conversations taking place on the MatExp Facebook group, with lots of ACTION threads being posted to generate discussion. The aim of these discussions is to identify ways that we can ACT to improve maternity experiences. Big, long-term actions that might require system change or a change in culture. And small, immediate actions, that professionals and individuals can take today to improve the maternity experience of those around them.

Over the last six months two big themes have emerged from #MatExp for me. The first is WHY are so many age-old issues still a problem for maternity care in this country? The answer to me is the working environment midwives face, as discussed here. The second is HOW can we make a real difference to family’s maternity experiences? So many actions have come out of #MatExp but the one that stands head and shoulders above, in my opinion, is continuity of care.

I don’t mean Ed Milliband’s diluted version of “the same midwife throughout labour”. I mean the same midwife antenatally, during labour and postnatally, or the same team of two or three midwives for the whole of that period. Women who hire independent midwives or who have access to OnetoOne Midwives have this type of continuity antenatally and postnatally, but they only have those same midwives during labour if they give birth at home. IMs and OnetoOne are not insured to act as midwives in hospital settings, although they can accompany women to hospital as advocates. Doulas are also with women as advocates and support for the whole of their pregnancy, birth and postnatal period but they are not qualified to act as midwives.

Continuity

When I brought up continuity of care as an ACTION thread on Facebook, I asked the following questions:

  • What are the barriers to providing continuity of care on the NHS? Is it as simple as not enough midwives, or is there more to it than that?
  • As an anxious person I really prioritised continuity of care, so used an independent midwife in my first pregnancy and a OnetoOne midwife in my second. What would my options have been on the NHS, under what circumstances can women be put onto a one-to-one care pathway?
  • What ACTION can we take to make continuity of care a reality?
  • What ACTION can we take to build good relationships between women and their midwifery teams where continuity of care is NOT a reality?

The suggested actions from the discussion that followed were:

  • Demonstrate the benefits of caseloading to NHS midwives
  • Strong leaders at the helm of trusts who themselves understand how to implement and lead their midwives into wanting continuity of care
  • NHS trusts to talk to independent midwives and social enterprise midwives who are the knowledgeable ones when it comes to providing continuity
  • Think about options for a team approach. One group member directed us to look at the Streatham Valley midwife team: “They were part of a pilot scheme for community midwives where you saw the same midwife and often they came to you for booking in and later appointments. They also checked you at home when in labour to avoid wasted trips to hospital and they have an excellent home birth record. Out of my ante natal group of 5 first time mum’s none of us had anything stronger than gas and air we had one home birth and only one use of forceps. They are amazing.”
  • Understand the positive impact that continuity of carer can have on patient safety and infant mortality
  • Find ways to care for midwives and avoid the “burn out” that is often associated with a caseloading model of working
  • Women with more complex pregnancies to be caseloaded by a team expert in their complexities – in other words, being at a higher risk of complications should not exclude women from continuity of care, in fact if anything these women need it more
  • Consider personalised budgets ( i.e. the NHS would allocate a woman funding to choose the service they wish) and whether or not this concept could help in delivering continuity of care
  • If continuity is not available then note-keeping needs to be excellent so women don’t always have to repeat themselves (which can be particularly hard following baby loss), and so that plans can be discussed and followed up
  • Women who are vulnerable or at risk of perinatal mental health problems should be at the front of the queue for continuity of care
  • Ensure that families are aware of and understand any choices they do have when it comes to their maternity care team

One healthcare professional commented “The commonest refrain you hear from mothers these days is ‘I never saw the same midwife twice’; this is a great sadness to me as surely the greatest gift to mediate the stressful vocation that is midwifery, is the relationship you develop with your ladies.”

Another woman who had opted for independent midwifery care in her second pregnancy commented “I just needed to know that someone was going to know me personally and take my wishes/needs seriously.”

Continuity of care was the strongest theme in the feedback to the National Maternity Review provided by my private Facebook group. It comes up time and again in discussions – I was discussing it today with student midwives at Salford University and they agreed that many midwives want to work to a caseloading model as much as families do. It just has to be constructed in a way that makes it feasible for midwives, many of whom have young families themselves.

Campaign for Choice
Campaign for Choice

This is not news. The RCM’s Better Births campaign has continuity of care as one of its key themes. The demand for caseloading from families accounts for the popularity of OnetoOne midwives in the areas where they are commissioned. A group of mothers in Greater Manchester is campaigning for the local CCGs to make this service available to women, and as someone who has benefited from that company’s care I joined them on a demonstration in Manchester city centre. If continuity is not going to be available on the NHS then OnetoOne might be the best option for families, although as this post of mine shows not all women find that the various services work together. 

What I find striking is how much continuity of care would impact on other areas where the #MatExp campaign has asked for ACTION. Anxiety is reduced if women know their carers. Emotional well-being is improved as are infant feeding outcomes. Dads & partners have more chance of being involved and having their own struggles recognised if they are able to get to know the family’s care team. It will be far easier for midwives and health visitors to collaborate if it is clear who is looking after which families.

I was delighted when an insurance solution was found for independent midwifery in this country. I also have high praise for the model of care provided by OnetoOne. Support and advocacy from a doula can be invaluable. But continuity of care should not be on the periphery of the UK maternity experience. It should BE the UK maternity experience.

 

Helen Calvert

@heartmummy

2015

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Time to Act for Better Collaboration with Health Visitors

There have been some fantastic conversations taking place on the MatExp Facebook group, with lots of ACTION threads being posted to generate discussion. The aim of these discussions is to identify ways that we can ACT to improve maternity experiences. Big, long-term actions that might require system change or a change in culture. And small, immediate actions, that professionals and individuals can take today to improve the maternity experience of those around them.

As a result of the day to day experiences of the mums on my Facebook group, I have been in touch with a number of senior health visitors to discuss the service and how it can potentially be improved. I presented to a group of health visiting managers in Greater Manchester last week, thanks to an invitation from Jill Beswick, and have been asked to speak to the new health visiting students at MMU in the autumn. For some of my thoughts on health visiting please see these three posts on my personal blog:

Health Visiting: Quality and Quantity

Health Visiting: Tell Us About It

Health Visiting: Keeping Everyone Happy?

456 6Cs

Jenny Harmer has written this very useful blog post about what a health visitor’s role entails. In terms of a family’s maternity experience, it is the health visitor who is responsible for their care for the first five years of the child’s life, and they certainly focus on the 1001 Critical Days, or from conception to age 2. They are currently focused on transition to parenthood, breastfeeding, healthy weight and maternal mental health (as well as accident prevention and school readiness) – these are topics crucial to a family’s maternity experience and issues that crop up again and again when families discuss postnatal care.

So we would hope that health visitors are working closely with midwives and other birth professionals to ensure a smooth transition to parenthood and ongoing care and support. Unfortunately, this is not what parents are routinely reporting, as I mentioned in my blog post for Sheena Byrom’s series, What The National Maternity Review Team Needs To Know. When I introduced this topic on the #MatExp Facebook group I asked:

  1. Midwives – are you aware of the health visitor’s role, their 6 High Impact Areas and the ways in which they can help families? Are you aware that many now offer antenatal visits? How do you work with health visitors, hand over to them and so on?
  2. Health Visitors – those who are already doing antenatal visits, are these done in conjunction with communication with the family’s midwifery team? How do you work with midwives postnatally to ensure a smooth handover for families?
  3. Parents – how well did your midwifery and health visiting teams work together? Have you examples of best practice? Where are the gaps?
  4. Everyone – how can we ACT to make improvements in this area?

The actions suggested were:

  • Pathways to be put in place for communication and handover from midwives to health visitors
  • Close working relationships between midwives and HVs so that each team can phone the other to access additional support for families
  • Student midwives to go on visits with health visitors to understand why collaborative working is so important
  • Best practice is for HV teams to have monthly meetings with midwives and GPs, and for midwives to ring the HV team about every discharge so they have a full picture for postnatal contact
  • Joined up IT systems – HVs currently use different systems to the maternity units, so they have no chance to check through maternity notes and only receive basic demographic information about families
  • Continued and consistent support for mums re infant feeding during the first six weeks
  • 7 day a week health visiting service to truly meet the needs of families
  • NNU and other hospital departments to inform health visitors if babies have been born early or sick so that HV can offer support to the family
  • Websites with all of the local maternity information for families, including health visiting services; better signposting from all NHS teams to other groups and sources of support available to families
  • Midwives to inform mothers at booking and during pregnancy that they will be offered an antenatal visit from the health visitor, and that it’s a good opportunity to discuss pregnancy and feeding methods, alongside other parenting issues. If it was part of the schedule given it would become normal – antenatal appointments with HVs are now offered to all pregnant women and dads/partners are encouraged to be present – it’s a holistic assessment
  • Midwife @JennytheM commented “I was on a study day about supporting vulnerable families and the importance of contacting the Health Visitor in such cases was reiterated – an electronic discharge pings to a GP and I’m going to find out if that can also go to the Health Visitor = instant information about discharge – which would help prevent communication failures.”

NHS England (West Midlands) has launched a campaign to raise awareness of the role of health visitors: http://www.bcpft.nhs.uk/about-us/news-and-events/529-campaign-launches-to-raise-awareness-of-health-visitors-and-thier-five-key-visits I hope HV teams continue to clarify their role in this way, both to families and to other birth professionals.

Commissioning of health visiting services moved from NHS England to local authorities on 1st October 2015. It is important that the birth community and families alike recognise what HVs have to offer so that their services continue to be provided across the country. Health visiting teams are responsible for 100% of children born in the UK. It is a massive remit, and one that can have a significant impact on public health if used to its full capacity.

 

Helen Calvert

@heartmummy

2015

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Time to Act on Infant Feeding

There have been some fantastic conversations taking place on the #MatExp Facebook group, with lots of ACTION threads being posted to generate discussion. The aim of these discussions is to identify ways that we can ACT to improve maternity experiences. Big, long-term actions that might require system change or a change in culture. And small, immediate actions, that professionals and individuals can take today to improve the maternity experience of those around them.

A topic I was keen to bring up was Infant Feeding, as Emma Sasaru and I are the “breastfeeding champions” for #MatExp (see our original “call to action” blog post). I was less keen to put together the subsequent blog post as it is such a huge and emotive topic, but I have finally put on my big girl pants and pulled it all together. The resulting post is in two parts: firstly, the actions and comments from the group thread. Secondly a little library of links to some fantastic blogs and articles that I really would recommend if you have an interest in this subject.

When I put up the thread on the Facebook group I asked the following questions:

Question 1: How can we ensure that every family is offered appropriate support to feed their own child, with respect to their individual circumstances?

Question 2: If you wanted to breastfeed but could not, was that due to a lack of appropriate support? If so, what support would have made a difference for you?

Question 3: If you wanted to breastfeed but could not, was that due to a medical issue that no amount of support could have alleviated? If so, what emotional support were you offered?

Question 4: If you formula feed, were you given good information about how to safely make up a bottle, skin-to-skin and paced / responsive feeding? As a healthcare professional do you have access to this information?

Question 5: Are all healthcare professionals now aware of and using First Steps Nutrition as their reference point for information about infant formula?

2015-07-12

A really interesting discussion ensued with lots of different experiences shared. The resulting action suggestions are as follows:

  • Far better infant feeding education antenatally – including what to expect, normal newborn behaviour, cluster feeding and safe & effective formula/bottle feeding. Explain that breastfeeding is a skill that mum and baby both have to learn and that it is difficult, but it does get easier. Emphasise the importance of asking for help and support.

  • If a family wants to breastfeed it is worth finding out whether anyone else in the family has done that before. Breastfeeding is much harder when those close to you do not understand it or are distrustful of it.

  • Don’t be so quick to discharge – observe a FULL feed before deciding that the baby is feeding effectively. Longer term consideration needs to be given to how long families can stay in hospital as quick discharge can mean mum is struggling by day 3.

  • Breastfeeding support needs to be 24/7 – one mum reported having a baby on the Wednesday and being unable to find NHS support when she hit “crisis point” at the weekend.

  • If part of your job is to support infant feeding, make it your mission to find out all of the places to which you can signpost families who are struggling. There is a lot of support and information out there but too often HCPs do not send families to it.

  • Be aware that birth professionals and other healthcare professionals often do not have sufficient training to deal with complex breastfeeding problems. As a parent, do not be afraid to question and ask for additional support. As an HCP, see above re signposting – know what is available in your area.

  • The NHS should provide information on non-NHS support options – International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs), breastfeeding counsellors and peer supporters, all the major voluntary organisations and doulas.

  • Full time, dedicated breastfeeding support midwives on every maternity ward, and support available after discharge. Relying on volunteer peer supporters is not a sustainable model. Unpaid peer supporters do an amazing job but to truly make a difference to infant feeding more paid staff are required.

  • Tongue tie to be checked for as part of the routine newborn checks. (Click here for more #MatExp discussion on this)

  • Be mindful of IV fluids used in labour when assessing the amount of weight a baby has lost. The initial birth weight may well have been inflated.

  • Where supplementary feeding is necessary, try to use a supplementary nursing system (SNS). They help to stimulate milk supply whilst giving the “top up” of formula or expressed milk.

  • Where a woman wants to breastfeed but has been unable to, please ensure she is given good quality, independent information on formula feeding AND emotional support around the fact that she was not able to meet her breastfeeding goals. A debrief with someone qualified in breastfeeding support would help to work through what happened and deal with some of those destructive (and unnecessary) feelings of guilt.

  • Empower, educate and support women so that they can make a genuine choice about how they want to use their body and how they want to feed their child. Once that genuine choice has been made, support that choice regardless of your personal viewpoint.

  • Do not be so quick to “blame” the dyad for breastfeeding difficulties. Look at potential underlying medical issues.

  • Normalise breastfeeding for the next generation by including it as part of the science/personal development curriculum

  • Support to feed babies at the breast needs to be moved far higher up the agenda for governments and healthcare commissioners alike

Remember this which Elizabeth Pantley shared on her Facebook page:

via http://www.pantley.com/elizabeth/ via http://www.pantley.com/elizabeth/%5B/caption%5D

We need to look after the “someones”. Understand their goals and fears, their preconceptions and their anxieties.

One of the mums on my private Facebook group gave a great summary the other day of how it’s all gone a bit wrong for infant feeding in the UK:

“Pressure from health professionals to feed but a lack of support to do so, meaning when mum comes across difficulties she just blames herself and feels she has to stop. (“I had no milk.”)

Decades of bottle feeding being promoted as “best” meaning our parents and grandparents don’t understand breastfeeding, and encourage formula feeding instead. (“Just put him on a bottle, it never did you any harm.”)

A formula feeding society making it seem that babies should be sleeping through the night and “in a routine” undermining the confidence of breastfeeding mums. (“Tom has been sleeping through from 2 weeks!”)

No counselling or debriefing for mums who felt they had to stop breastfeeding before they were ready.

The formula companies and their advertising promoting “mommy wars.”

A refusal to talk about bottle feeding openly and frankly by health professionals due to fear of causing offence.

The high price of formula making mums feel punished for bottle feeding.

We’re getting it all so, so wrong as a society and segregating parents when we should be uniting them. How you feed your baby shouldn’t even be an issue – the issue should be whether or not you are supported.”

Lucy, Dorset

Woman-asleep-with-books-002

So what would I recommend as a bit of infant feeding bedtime reading? There are so many fantastic resources, but based on the actions above and recent discussions this is my current pick of the pops:

  1. The “Second Night Concept” – why does it seem as though everything has “gone wrong” on night 2? 

  2. What is normal behaviour for a newborn baby anyway?

  3. If breastfeeding is so “natural” why is it so hard

  4. Who are all these different people who are qualified to support breastfeeding? 

  5. The hurt that is caused by the media constructed “mommy wars” 

  6. Why what I do with my breasts is none of your business 

  7. Are we really under pressure

  8. The part that the formula companies have to play 

  9. Are we being unfair to formula feeding mums?  

  10. Supporting women to breastfeed when they need medications 

 

There is also of course my own #hospitalbreastfeeding campaign which focuses on the support available for breastfeeding families on children’s wards and in children’s hospitals. There is another selection of fantastic links under the Guidance section on my website http://www.heartmummy.co.uk and for more discussion on this particular area please see https://heartmummy1980.wordpress.com/2015/05/10/when-hospitalbreastfeeding-met-wenurses-2/

Finally, if you are still suffering from insomnia, there is my own feeding story which covers formula feeding, combi feeding and natural term breastfeeding – I’ve tried to sample a bit of everything with my boys! 

I saw Mark Harris speak at the Association of Breastfeeding Mothers conference last month and he said something many will have heard him say before: “evidence is not the same as truth”. This has particular resonance for me when it comes to infant feeding. The evidence is about statistics, nationwide trends, health outcomes across generations and demographics. Truth is about what you can see with your own eyes and understand about your own family. There is no need to question or reject the evidence to protect your own truth. The evidence says quite clearly that my eldest son has a higher likelihood of poor health outcomes in later life because he was formula fed from 10 weeks old. The truth is that if I had tried to continue breastfeeding he had a 100% likelihood of being shouted at and rejected by his mother.

We all have our own truths. Finding someone with the same truth as you is so empowering but it is important to recognise that other people’s experiences are no less valid than yours. The evidence is important for parents making informed choices, and for commissioners when deciding on what priority to give infant feeding. The truth of your own circumstances and experiences is important for deciding what is best for you, and only you and your family know what that is.

The important thing is not what choices we make. The important thing is that we are supported so that we can make those choices. And at the moment far too many families are having their choice to breastfeed taken away. This has to change.

Reap benefits

Helen Calvert

@heartmummy

2015

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Time to Act on Breastfeeding and Medications

There have been some fantastic conversations taking place on the MatExp Facebook group, with lots of ACTION threads being posted to generate discussion. The aim of these discussions is to identify ways that we can ACT to improve maternity experiences. Big, long-term actions that might require system change or a change in culture. And small, immediate actions, that professionals and individuals can take today to improve the maternity experience of those around them.

I have great pleasure in sharing with you a guest blog from Infant Feeding Coordinator Luisa Lyons, a midwife and IBCLC at Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital.  Luisa led a discussion on the Facebook group about breastfeeding and medications, and this is here write up of that topic.  Take it away Luisa!

Luisa Lyons, guest blog author
Luisa Lyons, guest blog author

Can you breastfeed after having a tattoo? Can you breastfeed if you are on Prozac? Can you breastfeed if you take antihistamines?

As part of #FlamingJune, the #MatExp group discussed the topic of breastfeeding and medication. An interesting discussion took place and some actions were generated to help move forwards on this important topic to improve maternity experiences.

Breastfeeding mothers are frequently misinformed by health professionals with regard to what they can and cannot take, and at what dose whilst breastfeeding. Many mothers are told to stop breastfeeding unnecessarily, to “pump and dump” when not necessary or denied medications that could benefit them.

Contributors to the discussion described being denied medications for mental health conditions, or being prescribed medications later found to be harmful, being told to stop breastfeeding in order to be able to take anti-depressants or other medications to treat mental health issues.

The hurt and frustration women feel at discovering the advice was wrong is considerable and stays with them.

The increased risks to mothers from not taking medication which is indicated, and the risks of not breastfeeding to maternal and infant health mean that everyone involved in supporting new mothers needs to be aware of breastfeeding and medication.

Themes that were raised were assumptions that babies do not “need breastmilk” over six months and therefore stopping breastfeeding in order to take medication was then indicated. We know this is incorrect and that as long as a mother and baby dyad continue to breastfeed, the longer the beneficial health effects last, in a dose response manner. The World Health Organisation recommends breastfeeding exclusively for the first 6 months and then continuing up to 2 years of age and beyond.

Another theme was women with chronic pain conditions finding difficulty in accessing accurate information. In addition there were reported inaccuracies about dental extractions/sedation. Another breastfeeding mother got in touch to say she had suffered from hayfever for months before discovering she could have been taking the antihistamine Loratidine with no concerns.

BfN meds

NICE guideline Maternal and Child Nutrition (NICE, 2008) describes the standard of care that should be implemented with regard to prescribing for breastfeeding mothers. In standard 15 it states:

  • Ensure health professionals and pharmacists who prescribe or dispense drugs to a breastfeeding mother consult supplementary sources (for example, the Drugs and Lactation Database [LactMed] or seek guidance from the UK Drugs in Lactation Advisory Service.
  • Health professionals should discuss the benefits and risks associated with the prescribed medication and encourage the mother to continue breastfeeding, if reasonable to do so. In most cases, it should be possible to identify a suitable medication which is safe to take during breastfeeding by analysing pharmokinetic and study data. Appendix 5 of the ‘British national formulary’ should only be used as a guide as it does not contain quantitative data on which to base individual decisions.
  • Health professionals should recognise that there may be adverse health consequences for both mother and baby if the mother does not breastfeed. They should also recognise that it may not be easy for the mother to stop breastfeeding abruptly – and that it is difficult to reverse.

BfN

Dr Wendy Jones, pharmacist and breastfeeding tutor with the Breastfeeding Network and Independent Prescriber, has been instrumental in raising awareness of the issue in the UK and supporting thousands of women to breastfeed whilst on medication. She has so far written many factsheets on breastfeeding whilst taking medications. They can be found here https://www.breastfeedingnetwork.org.uk/detailed-information/drugs-in-breastmilk/drugs-factsheets/

So how can we ACT to improve experiences for mothers and babies?

LactMed

  • Empower women to question advice where they are told to stop breastfeeding in order to take a medication
  • Encourage evidence based information use to enable mothers to make informed decisions of risks and benefits where the evidence is not forthcoming on a particular drug
  • Devise e-learning packages for staff to learn more about infant feeding and include medications and breastfeeding in this training
  • Maternity units to forge closer links with public health departments to encourage joined up working
  • Make a poster for antenatal clinics asking women who are pregnant and on medications if they would like more information on their medications and future breastfeeding
  • Make the safety of Drugs in Breastmilk a less scary topic for HCP’s so that support can come upstream from the firefighting that Dr Wendy Jones and her colleagues have to do when mothers receive incorrect advice. The current system of women self-seeking information, largely online, means that less literate women are at a disadvantage
Luisa with Janette Westman who inspired her to get involved with infant feeding when they worked together in Bradford.
Luisa with Janette Westman, who inspired her to get involved with infant feeding when they worked together in Bradford.

Luisa Lyons
Infant Feeding Co-ordinator
Midwife and Lactation Consultant (IBCLC)
Maternity Services, West Block Level 3, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital

2015.

 

 

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Time to Act for Dads & Partners

There have been some fantastic conversations taking place on the MatExp Facebook group, with lots of ACTION threads being posted to generate discussion. The aim of these discussions is to identify ways that we can ACT to improve maternity experiences. Big, long-term actions that might require system change or a change in culture. And small, immediate actions, that professionals and individuals can take today to improve the maternity experience of those around them.

A topic that I brought up in the early days of the group was Dads & Partners.  How can we support them?  How can they support us?  How can they be involved in maternity experience?  What do they struggle with?

From the group discussion, and discussions I have had elsewhere, there are three key themes when it comes to Dads & Partners:

  • Including them in the maternity experience
  • Allowing them to stay with their new family
  • Supporting them with their own mental health & the mental health of their loved ones

 

It Takes Two

Including Dads & Partners in the maternity experience is helpful for all concerned.  It helps them to understand what is going to happen to the woman in their life, to prepare themselves for the different scenarios of birth and the postnatal period.  It empowers them to help the mother and brings them together as a unit, which is of huge benefit to the baby.  Informing and supporting Dads & Partners is a gift to a new family – Mark Harris of Birthing for Blokes explained at the ABM Conference last week that a well informed and prepared partner is a consistent presence for the mother, helping her every day where healthcare professionals might only be available briefly and inconsistently.

Mark also explained how men are generally “goal orientated” creatures who like to understand their role and the expectations that go with it.  Giving a man clear guidance as to how he can support the new mother in his life can be so helpful to the whole family.  From a breastfeeding perspective, for example, there are so many things that a Dad or Partner can do to truly support a breastfeeding mother, as a great blog by The Milk Meg explains.

Milk Meg

ACTION: healthcare professionals, please make sure that you find out who mum’s “cheerleaders” are going to be in pregnancy and in motherhood.  This might not be a father or a partner, it could be a grandparent or a friend, but whoever it is needs to be informed and empowered for their own benefit and the benefit of the mother & baby they care about.

ACTION: parents and families, be sure to speak up if you feel that not every member of the family team is being adequately supported on your maternity journey.

 

Stay With Me

Allowing Dads and Partners to stay with their new family in hospital once the baby is born is something that I see suggested over and over again as a key issue for parents.  NICU nurse Louise has written this blog post on the subject and I used it as an opener to the thread on the #MatExp group.  This comment from a group member demonstrated the way that dads can feel uninvolved:

“My husband really struggled after our first son was born. He felt ignored, pushed aside and unimportant whilst I was in labour, no one would tell him anything when I was being prepped in theatre and half an hour after my son was born he was thrown out, not allowed to walk me to the ward or have any time with us. It was better on the ward, they were more relaxed but obviously he still had to leave. When I got pregnant again it became obvious he has some major birth trauma to work through as well” (#MatExp Facebook group member)

When talking about partners being asked to leave once the baby was born, group members described this as “shocking”, “barbaric”, “being torn away from your support system” and overwhelming feelings of loneliness and being alone when “confused, dizzy, bleeding, trying to read breastfeeding leaflets and change meconium-filled nappies in the dark.”  The discussion was an emotional one, with many women feeling outrage that one half of their family and parenting team was ousted from the crucial first hours of the family and parenting experience.

I asked Mark Williams of Fathers Reaching Out for his thoughts on this:

“In my own experience it would have been easier for my wife after a twenty hour labour and an emergency C-Section for me to help her with my son. My wife hadn’t slept and was totally exhausted and coming down off medication so needed support, which I would have been able to give her.”

 From my own personal perspective, choosing a homebirth with my first baby was due in large part to my utter terror at the idea of being left alone in hospital with a new baby without the one person who understands me, understands my anxieties, cares about my wellbeing and knows how to support me.  This is Phil with Edward the morning after our son was born.  Overnight he had helped me to feed him, changed his nappy, settled him and by the morning we both knew as much about our new son as each other.  Why should any father be denied that?

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

ACTION: the goal of keeping families together to be at the forefront of maternity unit design.

ACTION: if your maternity unit does ask Dads & Partners to leave, please ensure that marketing reps are not allowed onto the unit at times when family members are not.  This is grossly unjust.

 

Overlooked

Just as women can be traumatised by the birth experience, suffer postnatally with depression and anxiety and feel overwhelmed by the responsibilities of parenthood, so can Dads & Partners.  Yet it was discussed on the group that men often don’t feel “allowed” to be traumatised or to be struggling.  There are connections here to other themes, as feeling disempowered at the birth can lead to problems later on for the partner.

Mark Williams campaigns for recognition of the needs of Dads & Partners when it comes to perinatal mental health.  This post on Stigma Fighters explains some of his journey.  This Fathers’ Day Mark is launching Dads Matter UK and is asking for the health service to “develop a process for the screening and detecting of PND in fathers.”  To read more about this campaign please have a look at this item from the Huffington Post.

Mark described to me what his own experiences have taught him about the needs of Dads & Partners:

“I feel dads need to know what is going on in order to help deal with their own anxiety – help from doulas could be a way forward. If you have a well dad or partner, you have a better chance the mother will be supported by them. Many fathers or partners I talk to just feel useless when dealing with the mother’s mental health, and sometimes that feeling of helplessness has an impact on them. Many dads isolate their true feelings so as not to upset the mother, or make matters worse.  They only want the mother of their child to be well and gain a full recovery.”

 Fathers Reaching Mark

ACTION: Follow @MarkWilliamsROW on Twitter and find out how you can join his campaigns.

ACTION: Recognise that Dads & Partners can suffer from perinatal mental illnesses too.

With best wishes to all the Dads & Partners out there, and to all those who are supporting mothers and caring for new babies.

Happy-Fathers-Day-Cards-3

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#Matexp – Emotional Wellbeing – what do families really need?

 Supporting families – Emotional Wellbeing


#Flamingjune is well under way and there has been so many wonderful conversations taking place on the Matexp facebook group. As part of this months campaign, ACTIONS to improve services have very much been at the forefront with everyone sharing ideas to make sure support given to families is the best it can be.

With this in mind one of the subjects discussed was Emotional Wellbeing. Many shared heartfelt stories, and personal experiences as well as ideas that would have made a difference them and their families.

Matexp asked;

  1. How much do you feel your pregnancy, birth and postnatal care affected your emotional wellbeing?
  2. How do you think we can help prepare women and their partners for the impact that birth and caring for a new baby has on emotional wellbeing ?
  3. What supported or helped you to protect your emotional wellbeing?
  4. What can be done to help health care professionals be able to support families better?

Many commented on how we often under estimate the impact having a new baby has on a family. It was said that ‘adapting from working life to being at home was overwhelming’, ‘that often dads are working long hours and need support too’ and having somewhere to go to talk to others and relax was vital. Emotional support was mentioned as being a “basic need” for families.

One comment noted that ‘real life’ parenting needs to be discussed at antenatal contacts. “We are bombarded with the prefect images of parenthood, I don’t think people are prepared for the realities of parenthood – being totally exhausted but this little person still needs feeding and there is no milk in the fridge so you cant even have a coffee to wake up you”.

Another commented’ ” professionals need to understand the stresses which parents face not just with the birth, but financial, logistical etc”. What suggestions were made that would help? “By looking through the eyes of the patient, and trying to see things from their point of view”. Yes walking in another’s shoes so to speak showing empathy, and understanding helps provide support that protects the emotional wellbeing of families.

Many voiced feeling left alone, isolated and ‘fending for themselves’ after the birth of their babies and how this impacted their emotional wellbeing. Many felt afraid to voice they were struggling with motherhood and kept it to themselves worrying they be dismissed or viewed as ‘failing’.

Others voiced how important good support from health visitors, peer support and support groups was to their emotional wellbeing and not just for mom but dads too. In fact is was mentioned how important it is to ask dads how they are doing too!

Again and again support was mentioned for birth trauma and loss of a baby. Things such as professional counselling to be available as standard and peer support on wards and units. As well as health professionals knowing where to signpost families for support including local charities and national organisations.

One comment read “the single biggest thing would have been to treat us respectfully”. Very sobering.

So what were some of the actions that came out of the discussion to help with emotional wellbeing?

  • Maternity units to have specially trained staff to care for those that have suffered birth trauma, loss or mental health issues.
  • To remember that care involves emotional support not just physical.
  • Peer support for families on wards and in NICU.
  • Specialist counselling services available as part of post-natal after care and on NICU unit so families do not have to leave their babies.
  • Antenatal support on ‘real life’ caring for a baby, as well as how to look after their emotional wellbeing.
  • After birth de-briefs for sharing of experiences both good and bad to help improve care given.
  • Remember that dads need support too.
  • Health professionals to be aware of support available to families so they can signpost.
  • For all staff supporting families to show kindness, compassion and empathy and provide care that is patient-centred meeting individual needs.
  • Most of all treat families with respect. “letting mums and dads know that being good is good enough – they don’t need to be perfect”.

Emotional wellbeing is important for families, by sharing experiences, listening and working together we can help improve the maternity experience for all.

There is beauty in giving to others

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Emma Jane Sasaru

@ESasaruNHS

 

 

 

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Birth trauma and PTSD – Raising awareness

darkest-passages-the-heart-is-unconquerable-dale-pelzer

When people think about post traumatic stress they often think of a soldier, returning from battle traumatised and battered by the ravages of war and the terrible things seen and experienced.

However PTSD doesn’t only affect those affected in the aftermath of war or a terrible natural disaster or violent act. PTSD can also affect someone in circumstances that should be safe, that should be happy, that should be the start of an amazing journey. For some women the birth of their baby can be traumatic and can be a trigger for PTSD that can severely affect their life. It can affect bonding with their baby, relationships with family and friends, doing everyday activities and physical health. So what is birth trauma and PTSD and how can we help and support women that are suffering?

Firstly what is birth trauma?

Birth trauma is in the eye of the beholder’ (Cheryl Beck) and this is true. What is traumatic to one woman may not be traumatic to another woman. Each woman’s experience of birth is unique to her and many things can add to a woman feeling her birth was traumatic. For some it maybe that her birth was a truly scary event, she may had been in an emergency situation where her life and that of her baby was at risk. Maybe her labour was very lengthy and very painful. It may be that a woman’s birth had high levels of medical intervention, such as induction, caesarean section, episiotomy, or other medical issues. It may be that a woman gives birth early and her pre-term baby requires care in NICU. Sadly some women have a birth that results in damage or injury to her baby and some lose their babies at birth.

For other women trauma can result from the way she is looked after by the staff responsible for her care both during the birth of her baby but also postnatally. She may feel a loss of control, dignity and privacy. There may have been a lack of information or a woman may feel she wasn’t listened to and her choices not respected or overlooked. She may feel she had medical procedures done without her consent or without proper explanation or that she was left with no choice. Or maybe unkind, cruel words and actions made her feel vulnerable and exposed.

Some women find birth triggers or adds to previous trauma such as rape or domestic abuse.

Often women who feel traumatised from their birth will feel isolated, other women may not understand why she feels traumatised, after all isn’t childbirth a ‘natural thing’? So a woman can feel guilty and somehow ‘weaker’ than other women for being unable to ‘cope’ with birth . She may feel she should be over the ‘birth’ and often well meaning friends and family will say things such as “at least you are ok and you have a healthy baby”. This only confounds the woman’s feelings and makes her feel more isolated and can damage relationships with partners, family members and friends as a woman feels no one understands and so she withdraws deeper into the trauma. Depending on the nature of the trauma a woman may feel unable to have further medical tests such as smear tests. Sex may also be affected as a woman may fear further pregnancies, or even just the act of physical intimacy itself. Many women who suffer birth trauma may struggle to bond with their baby, others become overly anxious of their babies health and wellbeing and constantly worry about every aspect of caring for their newborn.

For a woman that has lost a baby during birth or whose baby has been injured during birth she may experience overwhelming guilt, she may feel like it is her fault that she somehow failed her baby or that she should somehow have prevented it. She may play over and over again the birth in her head seeking answers or ways she could have changed the outcome.

Feeling like they have no voice, are misunderstood and weak many women will seek to hide their true suffering and ‘carry on’, the weight of trauma bearing down on them crushing hope, light and happiness as they try desperately to cling to normality. Everyday tasks become hard and just coping day to day can feel overwhelming. Their physical health too may suffer, as the effects of trauma ravage them mentally. Lack of sleep, trouble eating and the constant struggle all takes its toll. Flashbacks may take them back to the event reliving moments, even smells and conversations causing great distress and anxiety.

So what is PTSD and how does it differ from postnatal depression?

Often women can be wrongly diagnosed with PND when in reality they have PTSD.  While PTSD and PND can overlap as they do have some similar symptoms, they are very different. Its important that a woman receives a correct diagnose so she can have the support, help and therapies she needs. PTSD is the clinical term for a set of normal reactions to a traumatic, scary or bad experience or event. It can occur after a person experiences or witnesses something that was or they perceive to have been life-threatening.

Signs of PTSD include:

  • Feelings of intense fear, helplessness and/or terror.
  • The re-experiencing of the event by recurrent intrusive memories, flashbacks and/or nightmares. The individual will usually feel distressed, anxious or panicky when exposed to anything which remind them of the event.
  • Avoidance of anything that reminds them of the trauma. This can include talking about it, the place where the trauma happened or people that may have been involved in the trauma. (such as hospitals, doctors, healthcare professionals) Even T.V programs or books maybe avoided.
  • Bad memories and flash backs often result in difficulties with sleeping and concentrating, thus affecting daily activities. Sufferers may also feel angry, irritable and be hyper-vigilant or jumpy, easily startled.
  • Suffers may suffer panic attacks, depression and anxiety. They may feel detached, alone and have a sense of something bad may happen to them or their loved ones.

It is important to remember that PTSD is beyond the sufferer’s control. It is the mind’s way of trying to make sense of an extremely scary traumatic experience and are not a sign of an individuals ‘weakness’ or inability to cope. The person cannot just ‘get over it’ or ‘pull themselves together’ or ‘move on’. Rather they need help and support to process not only what has happened to them but also the feelings surrounding it.

So what can help a woman who has suffered birth trauma or PTSD?

For partners, family and friends its important to acknowledge what has happened to the women and her feelings surrounding it. Encourage her to talk about her feelings if she is able to. Help her to see you want to try to understand how she is feeling and that you recognise how traumatised she may feel.  Reassure her that you are there for her and that you will help in anyway you can. You maybe the only person that she trusts. Encourage, commend show compassion and empathy. Emotional support is invaluable, even if it’s just a listening ear or a hug. Realise that there may be things or activities that she may not yet feel ready to do, be patient and show understanding.

Encourage her to get help, whether it be her GP, health visitor, midwife or a charity such as the Birth Trauma association or Mind. This will not be easy as she may have a fear and distrust of telling anyone how she really feels especially a healthcare professional. Reassure her of your support, maybe offering to attend any appointments with her if she wishes. Asking for help will be hard, and so will the time undergoing any therapies being there for her providing emotional support is so important.

Also, helping with daily activities can mean so much, helping her get much needed rest offering to prepare a meal, or to do some shopping can also be invaluable.

Helping someone with PTSD can be difficult and frustrating.Partners and family can feel lost and confused too. Reading up on PTSD can help you understand it and how it can affect someone that is suffering.

Of course some partners too can feel traumatised and suffer from PTSD after seeing the birth of their baby. It is important they too seek help and support.

What about healthcare professionals?

Its important that any healthcare professional’s when supporting a woman after birth build a relationship built on trust. LISTEN, this is the single most important thing to a woman who is suffering. Listening enables you to truly know what she has been through, how she is feeling and whats important to her and her family.  Listening will enable you to know if she is likely to be suffering PTSD or any other perinatal mental health disorder. Listen also to her partner and family, they know her best, if they feel something isn’t right or reach out for your support then be there.  Ask for training in order to help you understand the different types of perinatal mental health issues and know the pathways and any local support available to signpost a women to.  Be careful of language used and do not minimise her feelings or experience.  If you know a woman has had a traumatic birth from postnatal notes etc, ASK, don’t ignore it.

What can a woman who has had birth trauma/PTSD do for herself?

  • Speak to someone, partner, family, friends, midwife, health visitor, GP. Don’t suffer in silence.
  • Remember you are not alone, there are others too that have been affected by birth trauma.
  • Remember you are not to blame.
  • Look after yourself, make sure you rest and eat a good balanced diet. Do things, activities that help you to relax.
  • Know your limitations and what you can do both physically and emotionally.
  • Speak to your hospital about your experience. Some women ask to see their medical notes and discuss exactly what happened to them and why.
  • Seek help and treatment. There are various treatments for PTSD such as counsellingEye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and medication.
  • Find local support groups or support groups on social media (such as birth trauma facebook support page)

Birth trauma is real and so is PTSD, its important that women get the help and support they need to overcome it. The birth of her baby can affect a woman for the rest of her life, it may not be possible to completely prevent birth trauma but what we can do is support women when things do go wrong and make sure that we show them love, compassion, kindness and help even at the darkest times so they believe that it will be possible to bathe in light again.hafiz-quote1

my story of birth trauma

Emma Jane Sasaru

@ESasaruNHS

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